Ed Frankl

[LFF Review] Ixcanul

Guatemala’s first-ever entry for the foreign language Oscar is an absorbing, beautifully-shot drama of cultural ritual and the drive of one young woman to escap...

[LFF Review] The Survivalist

Post-apocalyptic thrillers don’t come much leaner or meaner than Northern Irish director Stephen Fingleton’s gripping debut feature The Survivalist. The world’s...

[LFF Review] Trumbo

Bryan Cranston is irresistible as Dalton Trumbo, the blacklisted screenwriter of Oscar-winning classics Roman Holiday and Spartacus, in this sparkling period dr...

[LFF Review] Suffragette

Directed by a woman, written by a woman, and with a cast led by women, Suffragette opens the London Film Festival with the smashing of glass ceilings and shop w...

[Venice Review] Remember

A partial return to form for director Atom Egoyan comes in this Christopher Plummer-starring geriatric revenge thriller – Nazi hunting for the Best Exotic Marig...

[Venice Review] Taj Mahal

The attacks of November 2008 in Mumbai that left 195 people dead become a claustrophobic, almost austere affair in the hit-and-miss Taj Mahal, starring Nymphoma...

[Venice Review] 11 Minutes

An emperor’s new clothes of technical virtuosity, veteran Polish director Jerzy Skolimowski’s latest is a frenetic, kinetic, but largely insipid speed through t...

[Venice Review] Rabin, the Last Day

Amos Gitai is almost a running joke here at Venice. He’s had a film in competition on the Lido for the last three years (Tsili, Ana Arabia and Lullaby to My Fat...

[Venice Review] The Endless River

A family’s brutal murder is the catalyst for this hackneyed treatise on victims and perpetrators in this slow-burning, rudderless South African entry in competi...

[Venice Review] The Daughter

Each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way -- and some are off-the-scale unhappy. At the end of Australian theatre director Simon Stone’s absorbing, menacing...