Latest Features

New to Streaming: ‘It Follows,’ ‘Dr. Strangelove,’ ‘Rocky,’ ‘John Wick,’ and More

Written by TFS Staff, July 3, 2015 at 9:00 am 

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With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit the interwebs. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (Stanley Kubrick)

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For its stature as that rare political comedy which never truly loses relevance, it’s just a little hard to believe that Dr. Strangelove has recently turned 50. It should go without saying that the finest, most-fitting way to celebrate one of Stanley Kubrick‘s first great films — probably the third or fourth, depending on who you ask — is just watching the thing, which you can now do so on Amazon Prime, but those who want a story of how this classic was first brought together should have one more viewing option set up. Check out a behind-the-scenes documentary on it here. – Nick N.

Where to Stream: Amazon Prime

It Follows (David Robert Mitchell)

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Horror is a genre that gets passed over a lot in these kinds of lists. You can probably blame the cheap jump scare and loud noises productions that have dominated the field lately. So horror buffs and film fans of all stripes should be thrilled to see It Follows. Lovingly crafted with an emphasis on spatial relationships and slow burn tension, this is a film to remind the masses why horror is one of the most purely cinematic genres. – Brian R.

Where to Stream: Amazon, iTunes, Google

Hard to Be a God (Aleksei German)

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Yes, while perhaps a form of punishment cinema (trust me, search “Hard to Be a God… more like Hard to Sit Through” on Twitter), what separates this film is a certain openness, the ability to drift in and out of its hellish landscape of various synonyms for muck — shit, grime, etc. While the occasionally awkward fades to black are likely a result of the director’s death before completion, it only makes the experience feel more tangential, which, in this case, is very much a good thing. – Ethan V.

Where to Stream: Netflix, Fandor

John Wick (David Leitch and Chad Stahelski)

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John Wick is a refreshingly streamlined action movie. There’s not an ounce of fat in David Leitch and Chad Stahelski‘s film, and Derek Kolstad‘s script gets right everything so many revenge pictures get wrong. The familial scenes in the Taken movies, for example, are an afterthought — crap you have to trudge through to get to the shootouts. Actual time and care was put into the set-up of John Wick. When Wick’s dog dies, it’s an earned moment for the character and the film. It’s a strangely heartfelt movie, and far more sincere than most pieces of Oscar bait. What follows that effective set-up is a wildly entertaining action movie, filled with a variety of set pieces, fun kills, style, and a world that begs for a sequel. – Jack G.

Where to Stream: HBO Go

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Posterized July 2015: ‘Southpaw,’ ‘Magic Mike XXL,’ ‘Tangerine,’ and More

Written by Jared Mobarak, July 2, 2015 at 2:00 pm 

“Don’t Judge a Book by Its Cover” is a proverb whose simple existence proves the fact impressionable souls will do so without fail. This monthly column focuses on the film industry’s willingness to capitalize on this truth, releasing one-sheets to serve as not representations of what audiences are to expect, but as propaganda to fill seats. Oftentimes they fail miserably.


Are you ready to spend all your money this summer? Hollywood sure hopes you are because they’ve stocked piled a ton of big name franchises to be released the next 30 days. I’m talking the T-800, Mike, Marvel, Wally World, and Adam Sandler.

A couple of those look good, two have promise with checked expectations, and one looks so bad that the only laugh in the trailer came from Chris Hemsworth having absolutely no shame. While their posters will be littering multiplexes until Fall, however, don’t forget about the little guys too. Yes, I mean independent selections from the likes of Woody Allen, Tarsem Singh, and Asif Kapadia.

Those little yellow dudes appear to be worth your attention too …


What a tease

When you get to the fifth film of a franchise, no one expects much. It will probably be redundant, watered down, or so crazy you wonder how it even connects (my favorites are when a script with no relation to the series gets retrofitted to become one). Terminator Genisys (July 1) is none of these things—well it is pretty crazy and convoluted, but it works. Maybe Concept Arts hoped to drum up some interest out of those ready to dismiss it sight unseen because their teaser is a pretty effective visual pun.

There’s no more iconic image from the series than the T-800 skull, but we’ve never seen it like this. Made into an “hourglass” to align with the tag “Time is the Ultimate Weapon,” this face of horror is disintegrating into the sand counting us down to extinction. And if you’ve seen the film already, you could say it’s also possibly a spoiler for the construction of the latest Terminator model.

It definitely piques our intrigue more than old Arnold Schwarzenegger shrouded in shadow. Despite this, even that one is better than what BLT Communications, Inc. did with their twist spoiling series of fiery characters. John Connor is a machine now and the marketing team thought it would be cool to tell us weeks before opening day? Is someone getting fired over this?

Sadly BLT’s best with Emilia Clarke angled into the page’s corner is even forgettable. Maybe that’s just because the first thing I thought when looking at it was the firm’s own poster for Transformers: Age of Extinction.

WORKS ADV joins Concept Arts with a great teaser for Vacation (July 29). It too utilizes the most iconic graphic from the franchise—a vintage logo for every family’s favorite theme park Wally World. The play on Superman is appropriate too since we can assume Ed Helms‘ Rusty is going to follow in his hapless father’s footsteps to “save the day”. I could do without the obviously fake lens flare though.

The firm’s zoom out to show the rest of the family battered and dirty a la Alexander and the Really Long Name is much less effective. Slanted text worked on the teaser because it was a block angled to rest in the bottom right corner. This one has the tag at bottom left angling down off the page as though we should continue following it to the floor and forget the poster altogether.

The second entry on Route 66 with a flaming car is better if only because it makes sense as a scene. The actors were probably placed atop the road in post, but it’s not like they have a JC Penny backdrop behind them like the other.

BLT does redeem itself for their boring Genisys sheets on Pixels (July 24). Conceptually they only had to watch the brilliant short film the feature is based upon to hatch these scenes, but they stick to the conceit and nicely keep Sandler and crew off-screen.

Pac-Man and Caterpillar are my faves with Donkey Kong coming up second. The scale of Space Invaders seems off and I’ll be honest in my not knowing what is above Sydney, Australia. Regardless, the glowing, not quite static pixel boxes making up each character is simply a cool effect. If only the property could have found its way to the big screen sans the buffoonery. Columbia Pictures would be smart to never put a real person on any of their advertisements for what I still hope will be an enjoyable movie.

As for BLT’s Ant-Man (July 17) tease: it’s cute if also wholly on-the-nose. I wonder how it would have played if the title was absent and all we had was tiny Paul Rudd and the date. Make people work for their information. If you do it correctly they will.

This is Marvel, though, and there’s no way that would ever happen. Too much money is involved and it also appears Disney is VERY worried about this installment into their comic book universe. They’ve release a ton of footage from the film, they’re blanketing their coverage with Avengers references, and all their other posters are extremely cartoonish—a departure from every other franchise thus far introduced.

Just look at Art Machine, A Trailer Park Company‘s sheet with the titular hero riding an ant while bullets whizz by. It’s Honey I Shrunk the Kids caliber hokey and it looks faker despite a twenty-five year gap in photo manipulation technology. BLT’s full sheet is amateur hour with every actor in the movie fading into nothingness and the big blurry people flicking tiny adversaries off themselves is aimed at ten-year olds. Right? Half those foreground arms are nowhere near plausibly attached to the person showcased.

It’s disappointing when the best posters of this campaign are the ones riding Captain America, Thor, and Iron Man’s coattails.


In your face

You have to give Concept Arts credit for their Magic Mike XXL (July 1) teaser. This sequel is supposed to be even more fun and comedic than the first so why not follow suit with puns while blatantly putting the requisite abs on display? Channing Tatum doesn’t mind in the slightest as proven by his many surprise appearances at screenings to bump and grind on “lucky” ladies in the audience. He and his movie are most assuredly coming.

I also like the font work with its stenciled, boldly angled lettering cutting into the page. Chiseled text against chiseled bods? Perhaps. The brushed gold is a nice touch too, especially juxtaposed with the monochrome actors living it up in the rest of the white void. The combo platter is lacking with so many plopped in at once, but the individual character sheets deliver some nice compositions. I like that they aren’t afraid to play with the canvas.

With Wonderland‘s Amy (limited July 3) it’s all about the name. This is a smart maneuver because it’s tough to know what to expect by something so widely used. Place it atop tattoos with that upper lip stud above, however, and it’s hard not to know who the owner of this “Amy” is. Take the bottom stills off of Creative Partnership‘s Senna (also directed by Kapadia) and you have a similar technique.

It’s just more intriguing than its counterpart with Amy Winehouse seen in full and the title pushed to the side. The effect is gone and in fact the word “Amy” almost disappears completely, taking on the role of caption rather than focal point. At this point you might as well take it off completely and let the image of Winehouse speak for itself. There’s your tease: her face and tattoos with nothing but a date at the bottom.

And while the tag is more on-the-nose than Ant-Man‘s cuteness—”The Girl Behind the Name” is a perfect description of what the poster projects. Here’s a gorgeously cropped image showcasing personal identity via artwork above looks that literally has a name placed on top of it. The translucency only enhances the device by telling us neither name or image is more important than the other.

I’m torn on Gravillis Inc.‘s Southpaw (July 24). It’s definitely in your face and brutal with a jacked up Jake Gyllenhaal that has been making the rounds on the internet for months to show what he’s done to prepare for this role—a rough depiction with grit and guts that ultimately loses both. It’s surprising to see how polished and mainstream the firm went with a photo that could have easily impacted audiences without the gloss.

First mistake is the fake distress around the edges—I get you don’t want to cover your meal ticket with blemishes, but it’s hard to believe whatever “ruined” this image avoided the actor completely. Second is the coloring. I see this really popping in a high contrast black and white as opposed to the over-saturated richness of an HBO Boxing poster. Third—and this is a design no-no that was ingrained in my head during school—is the title being rotated 90-degrees the wrong way. It’s easier for American eyes to read sideways text from bottom to top as it retains our left to right conditioning. Top to bottom confuses our eyes and we have to rotate the page backwards for it to be correct. Maybe this disorientation was intentional to represent the impaired sight Jake must have.

I barely like the alternate sheet of Gyllenhaal and Rachel McAdams caught in a lovers’ embrace more. The coloring is subdued and the pockmarks are gone, but sadly most of the text is way too big and the whole too straightforward to earn my attention.

One poster I do love this month is Samba (NY/LA July 24). I was very bored with Le Cercle Noir‘s French faces adverts on display for its TIFF bow and it seems so was cold open. The latter firm takes what the international version did and makes it more international for lack of a better term. The color change, the hand-written scrawls, and the painterly aesthetic—it’s night and day. I see this sheet multiplied one hundred-fold on the side of an urban wall.

There’s a playfulness involved now that shine through the film. I adored it when I saw it and tonally it needs something looser like this to get people excited.

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15 Films to See in July

Written by Jordan Raup, July 1, 2015 at 1:00 pm 

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After highlighting our 30 favorite films of the year thus far, it’s time to transition to the back half of 2015. July kicks things off with a fairly major month. While we easily could’ve doubled our standard ten recommendations, we’ve elected to bump it up to fifteen. This means promising and acclaimed independent dramas such as Catch Me Daddy, The Kindergarten Teacher, 10,000KM, Stray Dog, Court, A Hard Day, Samba, Stations of the Cross, Creep, Mr. Holmes, and Jimmy’s Hall just missed the cut, as well as some of the year’s finest documentaries, including Cartel Land, A Poem is a Naked Person and Best of Enemies. On a bigger scale, we’re also slightly interested in the R-rated hijinks of Vacation and to see if any of Edgar Wright‘s stamp is left on Ant-Man. Suffice to say, it’s an excellent month at the movies and one can check out top 15 films recommendations below.

15. Southpaw (Antoine Fuqua; July 24th)

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Synopsis: A boxer fights his way to the top, only to find his life falling apart around him.

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Why You Should See It: While Antoine Fuqua‘s track record doesn’t hint that Southpaw will be a (ahem) knock-out, Jake Gyllenhaal‘s latest string of performances certainly has us looking forward to the boxing drama. Early reviews suggest as much, praising a fierce leading turn but lamenting the stale story surrounding it. Regardless, it’ll hopefully be a nice warm-up to Creed later this year, and perhaps Hands of Stone on the festival circuit.

14. Irrational Man (Woody Allen; July 24th)

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Synopsis: A tormented philosophy professor finds a will to live when he commits an existential act.

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Why You Should See It: Considering his output, it’s quite impressive that Woody Allen has yet to make a flat-out misfire. While our review is mixed, the sheer curiosity of Joaquin Phoenix embodying a Woody Allen-type has me intrigued. We said back at Cannes, “Reteaming with Darius Khondji, the cinematography is occasionally stunning, especially in some of the film’s more naturalistic settings, and the penultimate scene is an absolute riot. Nonetheless, when the credits began to roll there’s a sense the entire affair was underwhelming, especially considering the substantial ensemble.”

13. Boulevard (Dito Montiel; July 17th)

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Synopsis: A devoted husband in a marriage of convenience is forced to confront his secret life.

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Why You Should See It: This month will bring the last leading performance from Robin Williams, and it’s also one of his most complex. We said in our review, “An unexpected turn for director Dito Montiel, known for his portraits of rugged masculinity in the inner city, including his debut future A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints and FightingBoulevard is a tender portrait of a man about to shatter an illusion he’s created for himself. Opening with an out-of-focus shot of Nolan Mack coming to terms with the eventual death of his father, Nolan, like his father and the audience, are not ‘present’ in the moment.”

12. Phoenix (Christian Petzold; July 24th)

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Synopsis: A disfigured concentration-camp survivor (Nina Hoss), unrecognizable after facial reconstruction surgery, searches ravaged postwar Berlin for the husband (Ronald Zehrfeld) who might have betrayed her to the Nazis.

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Why You Should See It: After being seen alongside Philip Seymour Hoffman in Anton Corbijn‘s A Most Wanted Man, last year Nina Hoss has reteamed with Barbara director Christian Petzold for a new drama. We said in our review, “Following the Second World War, European auteurs probed its lingering national psychological fallout resulting in films such as Night and FogHiroshima Mon Amour, and Germany Year Zero. Phoenix sits well within that style, its historical perspective strangely 60 years out of date but not unwelcome for it. Themes of identity, guilt, and misrecognition play out when a Holocaust survivor returns to Berlin.”

11. Alleluia (Fabrice Du Welz; July 17th)

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Synopsis: Michel, a murderous womanizer, meets introverted Gloria online and treats her to a whirlwind one-night-stand. Offering herself as an accomplice in his seductive crimes, the unhinged lovers embark on a deadly odyssey amplified by wild sex, unbridled jealousy, and passionate forays into the dark arts.

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Why You Should See It: One of the sleeper thrillers of the summer looks to be Fabrice Du Welz‘s Alleluia. We had the chance to see it back at Fantastic Fest, saying in our review, “This is just a bleak, dark, and yet humorous experience that is full of twists and turns that are at times truly heartbreaking. It’s not even necessarily the reality of what takes place on screen, but the way that you know their relationship has real-life counterparts, even if they are less dramatic and cruel. If Fantastic Fest is about discovery and seeing the kind of film not built for every taste, the blood-soaked, sex-fueled thriller that is Alleluia is the perfect fit.”

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Recommended Discs & Deals of the Week: ‘Kumiko,’ ‘While We’re Young,’ ‘Vanilla Sky,’ and More

Written by TFS Staff, June 30, 2015 at 12:54 pm 

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Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Five Easy Pieces (Bob Rafelson)

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Following Jack Nicholson’s breakout supporting turn in Easy Rider, director Bob Rafelson devised a powerful leading role for the new star in the searing character study Five Easy Pieces. Nicholson plays the now iconic cad Bobby Dupea, a shiftless thirtysomething oil rigger and former piano prodigy immune to any sense of responsibility, who returns to his upper-middle-class childhood home, blue-collar girlfriend (Karen Black, in an Oscar-nominated role) in tow, to see his estranged, ailing father. Moving in its simplicity and gritty in its textures, Five Easy Pieces is a lasting example of early 1970s American alienation. – Criterion.com

Hard to be a God (Aleksey German)

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Yes, while perhaps a form of punishment cinema (trust me, search “Hard to Be a God… more like Hard to Sit Through” on Twitter), what separates this film is a certain openness, the ability to drift in and out of its hellish landscape of various synonyms for muck — shit, grime, etc. While the occasionally awkward fades to black are likely a result of the director’s death before completion, it only makes the experience feel more tangential, which, in this case, is very much a good thing. – Ethan V.

Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter (David Zellner)

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One of the better directed films one is bound to see this year, David Zellner‘s Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter is a tightly controlled, beautifully-shot oddity with a deeply felt performance from The Brothers Bloom and Pacific Rim star Rinko Kikuchi. Using the true story of one person’s obsession with a fabricated story, Kumiko may be peculiar, but it’s an ultimately powerful and tragic fable of passion. #TeamBunzo, indeed. – Jordan R.

Vanilla Sky (Cameron Crowe)

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For all the expectations a Cameron Crowe tag is likely to set, Vanilla Sky seems almost intent on knocking (nearly all) of them down with blunt, shocking force — though, for better or for worse, much of the shock would often come from its 1997 Spanish source, Open Your Eyes. If deviations can’t be entirely indebted to a filmmaker straying outside their comfort zone, Crowe retools the ending into something clever and trickier, working his obsessions with popular culture into the story’s fabric rather fittingly. Which isn’t to suggest “subtly,” too.  – Nick N.

While We’re Young (Noah Baumbach)

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Noah Baumbach’s While We’re Young is wise, funny, fiercely intelligent and always involving. It’s not just the director’s most complete film — it’s also his best, an even stronger, more ambitious creation than his last Toronto International Film Festival entry, Frances Ha. Here, aided by his most impressive cast to date — Ben Stiller, Naomi Watts, Adam Driver, Amanda Seyfried, Charles Grodin, and Adam “Ad Rock” Horowitz (!) — Baumbach has pulled off something truly impressive. He has made a heartfelt comedy that is as humorous as it is emotionally relatable. – Chris S. (full review)

Also Arriving This Week

Danny Collins
The Gunman (review)
Valerie and Her Week of Wonders

Recommended Deals of the Week

(Note: new additions are in red)

12 Years a Slave (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Adaptation (Blu-ray) – $7.99

A Most Wanted Man (Blu-ray) – $7.99

A Most Violent Year (Blu-ray) – $12.99

The American (Blu-ray) – $8.48

Amelie (Blu-ray) – $5.99

Anna Karenina (Blu-ray) – $12.05

The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (Blu-ray) – $9.29

Beginners (Blu-ray) – $9.10

Black Swan (Blu-ray) – $6.75

The Brothers Bloom (Blu-ray) – $7.99

The Cabin in the Woods (Blu-ray) – $7.88

Casino (Blu-ray) – $9.49

Captain Phillips (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Children of Men (Blu-ray) – $8.45

Cloverfield (Blu-ray) – $7.88

Collateral (Blu-ray) – $7.88

Contempt (Blu-ray) – $11.75

The Counselor (Blu-ray) – $7.99

The Descendants (Blu-ray) – $7.99

Do the Right Thing (Blu-ray) – $9.18

Drive (Blu-ray) – $7.99

The Fly (Blu-ray) – $6.99

Gangs of New York (Blu-ray) – $7.50

Goodfellas (Blu-ray) – $8.08

Good Will Hunting (Blu-ray) – $7.50

The Graduate (Blu-ray) – $7.99

Grave of the Fireflies (Blu-ray) – $9.99

The Grey (Blu-ray) – $8.57

Haywire (Blu-ray) – $7.64

Hot Fuzz (Blu-ray) – $7.88

The Illusionist (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Inglorious Basterds (Blu-ray) – $8.45

Jackie Brown (Blu-ray) – $5.00

Jane Eyre (Blu-ray) – $7.99

Jaws (Blu-ray) – $10.99

John Wick (Blu-ray) – $12.99

Killing Them Softly (Blu-ray) – $7.88

L.A. Confidential (Blu-ray) – $8.49

The Lady From Shanghai (Blu-ray) – $8.99

Looper (Blu-ray) – $9.96

Lost In Translation (Blu-ray) – $8.71

Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (Blu-ray) – $6.49

Margaret (Blu-ray) – $9.49

Martha Marcy May Marlene (Blu-ray) – $6.99

The Ultimate Matrix Collection (Blu-ray) – $23.99

Michael Clayton (Blu-ray) – $9.69

Never Let Me Go (Blu-ray) – $6.28

No Country For Old Men (Blu-ray) – $7.50

Observe & Report (Blu-ray) – $6.99

Office Space (Blu-ray) – $5.88

Pariah (Blu-ray) – $6.49

Persepolis (Blu-ray) – $6.49

Public Enemies (Blu-ray) – $8.57

Pulp Fiction (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Reality Bites (Blu-ray) – $9.49

The Secret In Their Eyes (Blu-ray) – $6.60

Seven (Blu-ray) – $6.88

Seven Psychopaths (Blu-ray) – $7.99

Shutter Island (Blu-ray) – $6.87

A Single Man (Blu-ray) – $6.14

The Spectacular Now (Blu-ray) – $7.88

Spring Breakers (Blu-ray) – $9.93

Synecdoche, NY (Blu-ray) – $6.59

There Will Be Blood (Blu-ray) – $7.88

The Tree of Life (Blu-ray) – $6.99

The Truman Show (Blu-ray) – $7.99

True Grit (Blu-ray) – $7.99

This is the End (Blu-ray) – $9.99

We Own the Night (Blu-ray) – $6.88

Where the Wild Things Are (Blu-ray) – $6.94

Whiplash (Blu-ray) – $14.99

The Wrestler (Blu-ray) – $5.99

Zero Dark Thirty (Blu-ray) – $9.99

What are you picking up this week?

New to Streaming: ‘Ex Machina,’ ”71,’ ‘Gone Girl,’ ‘Beyond the Lights,’ and More

Written by TFS Staff, June 26, 2015 at 1:30 pm 

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With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit the interwebs. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

’71 (Yann Demange)

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In an AFI Fest post-screening discussion of his new film ’71, director Yann Demange expressed the legitimate concern that certain audiences, specifically those of an American stripe, may not know enough about “The Troubles” to appreciate the film’s historical accuracy. While a good number of Americans can likely draw on enough existing knowledge about their national conflicts (e.g. WWII or Vietnam) to grasp the significance of films depicting such events, comprehension of the Northern Ireland conflict is seemingly surface-deep. Demange was adamant that the political elements on display in ’71 are, in fact, historically accurate. – Brian P. (full review)

Where to Stream: Amazon, iTunes, Google

Ballet 422 (Jody Lee Lipes)

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The inception and design that goes into creating any artistic work is a marvel to witness. It is this purity of concept that propels director and cinematographer Jody Lee Lipes‘ captivating documentary about a young prodigy ballet dancer, Justin Peck. The film is as much about documenting the creative process as documenting the intricacies of ballet. With its brisk pace and unique style, Ballet 422 is a cinematic delight that encapsulates the passion of two inspired artists: the one in front of the camera and the one behind it. – Raffi A. (full review)

Where to Stream: Netflix

Beyond the Lights (Gina Prince-Bythewood)

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Beyond the Lights delights in being exactly what it is — which, unfortunately, is something most will dismiss as standard date-night fare without casting a second glance. Yes, at one level, it is a very good, albeit predictable film perfect for couples looking for something both heartening but intelligent. At another, it delivers to us one of the most compelling and endearing female characters we’ve seen this year, and it turns out she’s hiding right there, beneath the girl everyone has been looking at all along. This is another minor gem in Prince-Bythewood’s directorial crown. – Nathan B.

Where to Stream: Netflix

Big Game (Jalmari Helander)

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Despite being rated PG-13 in America, Jalmari Helander‘s Big Game should target audiences between 10-15 like Dan Smith‘s Young Adult novelization of the film. Being a Finnish production—the most expensive in the country’s history—probably means it did just that abroad. Unfortunately Americans cringe at the sound of curse words reaching their children’s ears, forgetting how readily accessible they are at home on TV and otherwise depending on whether parents or siblings aren’t careful. The inclusion of this language as well as the amount of death necessary for an action film of its kind to be effective ultimately puts the studio in the tough position of pretending the final result’s palatable for older audiences hoping for a good ol’ fashioned ass-kicking. At the end of the day, however, Big Game‘s a thirteen-year old’s coming of age adventure. – Jared M. (full review)

Where to Stream: Amazon, iTunes, Google

Creep (Patrick Brice)

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Blumhouse Productions has become a horror powerhouse with its many popular and expansive titles, ranging from the ever-growing Paranormal Activity series to the endless sequel potential of the dystopian thriller The Purge. Fortunately, the company’s ambitions lie beyond becoming a tireless franchise machine, as evidenced by Creep, a minor curiosity that melds Blumhouse’s penchant for found footage with a free-wheeling indie spirit. – Amanda W. (full review)

Where to Stream: iTunes

Ex Machina (Alex Garland)

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Artificial intelligence is the anointed “next big thing” of our time, and so it makes sense that film would seek to address it. But whereas something like Avengers: Age of Ultron treats artificial intelligence as a way to create an “inhuman” force for evil, Ex Machina decides to use the creation of consciousness as a means of reflecting our own base humanity back at us. Smart, sleek, and spare, Ex Machina functions as a dagger elegantly carving out our own heart to show it back to us. – Brian R.

Where to Stream: Amazon, iTunes, Google

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The Best Films of 2015 (So Far)

Written by TFS Staff, June 23, 2015 at 2:30 pm 

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With a week to go until 2015 crosses the halfway mark, now’s the time to take a look back at its first six months and round up our favorite films thus far. While the end of this year will bring personal favorites from all of our writers, think of the below 30 entries as a comprehensive rundown of what should be seen before heading into a promising fall line-up.

As a note, this feature is based solely on U.S. theatrical releases from 2015, with many currently, widely available on home video, streaming platforms, or theatrically. Check them out below, as organized alphabetically, followed by honorable mentions and films to keep on your radar for the remaining summer months. For those on Letterboxd, one can find the list here.

About Elly (Asghar Farhadi)

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A few years before A Separation left its considerable mark on the world-cinema landscape, Asghar Farhadi had another masterpiece under his belt. Why it’s been unavailable in the United States for some six years is a total mystery, but that (courtesy of Cinema Guild) has finally been taken care of — and now, at long last, here is About Elly. For fitting the mold of mystery, hangout movie, social critique, and gender-dynamics drama with equal aplomb, this film is the clearest example of Farhadi’s considerable powers. Its 2009 tag be damned, About Elly is one of the best “new” releases we’ve been given this year. – Nick N.

Amour Fou (Jessica Hausner)

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An ecstatically original work of film-history-philosophy with a digital-cinema palette of acutely crafted compositions. Amour Fou seamlessly blends together the paintings of Vermeer, the acting of Bresson, and the psychological undercurrents of a Dostoevsky novel. It is an intensely thrilling and often slyly comic work that manages to combine a passionately dispassionate love story of the highest order with a larger socio-historical examination of a new era of freedom, and the tragedy beset by those trapped in its enclosed world. – Peter L.

Appropriate Behavior (Desiree Akhavan)

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Iranian-American filmmaker and actress Desiree Akhavan channeled Woody Allen for her feature debut, a romantic comedy about Shirin (Akhavan), an aimless 20-something struggling to get over her ex-girlfriend. But while the film recalls the storytelling and New York intellectual vibe of Annie Hall, it stands apart with a distinctive deadpan humor and bisexual female perspective. More importantly, however, it’s a damn funny movie and a welcome introduction to a talented new voice. – Amanda W.

Ballet 422 (Jody Lee Lipes)

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The spectacle of ballet is inherently cinematic, married as it is between the visual and aural arts. The art of creation, however, is much less so, married as it is to silence, pondering, and repetition to the point of perfection. Ballet 422 uses composition, editing, and unfettered observation to create a compelling portrait of a novice choreographer’s first full-length ballet, and the result is as engrossing as they come. – Brian R.

Beloved Sisters (Dominik Graf)

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If German cinema has been dominated by reservation, here is kissing, screaming, fucking, pushing, breaking, and running. Most of all, Beloved Sisters embraces feeling, turning even the written word into a series of direct addresses that passionately reach toward its receiver instead of only an admiration for the transference of materials. Graf’s camera flies through these mansions and small alcoves with every cinematic technique known to man — push-ins, zooms, wipes, dissolves, quick pans, jumping titles! — but, most of all, he relies on the work of his editor to conflate time and space into pure emotion. – Peter L.

Blackhat (Michael Mann)

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Michael Mann is one of the few directors still making thoughtfully composed and visceral action films for an audience that refuses to turn its brain off. That Mann also chooses to tackle concerns of the modern world while still maintaining his old-school action aesthetic is icing on the cake. Blackhat took some heat for its portrayal of a buff, rough and tumble hacker, but with a genuine understanding of computers and the implementation of classic Mann action scenes, this movie still stands as one of the best of the year so far.  – Brian R.

Buzzard (Joel Potrykus)

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A film obsessed with the post-recession, post-NSA era, Buzzard is littered with money (or the lack of it) that recalls neo-realist greats, but not by making a film about the toils of the human spirit. Instead, it takes the form of the a bro genre movie (pair this with Entourage for real whiplash), and peppers each one of its moments with stunning accuracy and an extreme paranoia. It’s a film that understands the new American dream is a bowl of spaghetti and meatballs instead of two microwaved Hot Pockets. – Peter L.

Clouds of Sils Maria (Olivier Assayas)

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Movies about making movies often get a bad rap; there’s just a presumed pretentiousness that goes along with watching filmmakers and actors defending their craft. So when it turns out that Clouds of Sils Maria is actually a beautifully directed and acted defense of the timelessness and universal value of storytelling in all forms, what could have been a European Birdman actually becomes something so much more. – Brian R.

The Duke of Burgundy (Peter Strickland)

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Peter Strickland’s The Duke of Burgundy is an immersive experience that demands to be pondered, discussed, and watched again. This visually sumptuous, aesthetically sublime study of role-playing and sadomasochism (but funny!) is a true stunner, and certain to become a cult classic. While Strickland deserves much of the credit, as does the credited creator of its perfumes (the credit reads “Perfume by Je Suis Gizelle”), the performances of co-leads Sidse Babett Knudsen and Chiara D’Anna are especially worthy of praise, note-perfect as lovers immersed in a relationship of role-playing and elaborate (controlled) deception. Infused with the spirit of ’70s sexploitation and influenced by everyone from Fassbinder to Brakhage, Burgundy is an achievement like no other in recent memory. In fact, it’s no exaggeration to say you’ve never seen anything quite like it. – Christopher S.

Eden (Mia Hansen-Løve)

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At this point, it should be obvious enough that we’re really quite fond of Mia Hansen-Løve‘s Eden, so I’ll save us some time by linking to my review — which, though several months old, in no way reflects a once-higher evaluation — and interviews with the director and co-writer / central inspiration. This is a film whose reputation will only grow in the years to come. Don’t sleep on it while a big-screen experience is still available. – Nick N.

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Recommended Discs & Deals of the Week: ‘Timbuktu,’ ‘The Fisher King,’ ‘Jesse James,’ and More

Written by TFS Staff, June 23, 2015 at 12:42 pm 

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Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

The Fisher King (Terry Gilliam)

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A fairy tale grounded in poignant reality, the magnificent, Manhattan-set The Fisher King, by Terry Gilliam, features Jeff Bridges and Robin Williams in two of their most brilliant roles. Bridges plays a former radio shock jock reconstructing his life after a scandal, and Williams is a homeless man on a quest for the Holy Grail—which he believes to be hidden somewhere on the Upper East Side. Unknowingly linked by their pasts, the two men aid each other on a fanciful journey to discovering their own humanity. This singular American odyssey features a witty script by Richard LaGravenese, evocative cinematography by Roger Pratt, and superb supporting performances by Amanda Plummer and an Oscar-winning Mercedes Ruehl, all harnessed by Gilliam into a compassionate, funny modern-day myth. – Criterion.com

Timbuktu (Abderrahmane Sissako)

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Abderrahmane Sissako can no longer be called one of the greatest African directors of our time; he has become, simply, one of the greatest directors of our time. With his fifth feature, Timbuktu, Sissako fuses the poetic visual language of Waiting for Happiness with the political urgency of Bamako to bring about a revelatory work, something along the lines of a Howard Hawks jihadi-hangout movie. I mean that as a very good thing. – Peter L. (full review)

Also Arriving This Week

The Bridge
Dog Soldiers

Recommended Deals of the Week

(Note: new additions are in red)

Adaptation (Blu-ray) – $7.99

A Most Wanted Man (Blu-ray) – $7.99

A Most Violent Year (Blu-ray) – $12.99

The American (Blu-ray) – $6.29

Amelie (Blu-ray) – $6.66

Anna Karenina (Blu-ray) – $12.05

The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (Blu-ray) – $8.06

Beginners (Blu-ray) – $9.10

Black Swan (Blu-ray) – $6.74

The Brothers Bloom (Blu-ray) – $7.99

The Cabin in the Woods (Blu-ray) – $7.88

Casino (Blu-ray) – $8.87

Captain Phillips (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Children of Men (Blu-ray) – $7.88

Cloverfield (Blu-ray) – $7.88

Collateral (Blu-ray) – $7.88

Contempt (Blu-ray) – $12.73

The Descendants (Blu-ray) – $7.51

Do the Right Thing (Blu-ray) – $9.21

Drive (Blu-ray) – $7.99

The Fly (Blu-ray) – $6.99

Gangs of New York (Blu-ray) – $7.50

Goodfellas (Blu-ray) – $8.35

Good Will Hunting (Blu-ray) – $7.50

The Graduate (Blu-ray) – $7.99

The Grandmaster (Blu-ray) – $5.99

The Grey (Blu-ray) – $8.57

Haywire (Blu-ray) – $7.64

Hot Fuzz (Blu-ray) – $7.88

The Illusionist (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Inglorious Basterds (Blu-ray) – $7.99

Jackie Brown (Blu-ray) – $5.00

Jane Eyre (Blu-ray) – $8.12

Jaws (Blu-ray) – $10.99

John Wick (Blu-ray) – $12.99

Killing Them Softly (Blu-ray) – $7.88

L.A. Confidential (Blu-ray) – $8.50

The Lady From Shanghai (Blu-ray) – $8.99

Looper (Blu-ray) – $9.96

Lost In Translation (Blu-ray) – $8.71

Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (Blu-ray) – $6.49

Margaret (Blu-ray) – $9.49

Martha Marcy May Marlene (Blu-ray) – $6.99

Michael Clayton (Blu-ray) – $9.69

Never Let Me Go (Blu-ray) – $6.50

No Country For Old Men (Blu-ray) – $7.50

Observe & Report (Blu-ray) – $7.49

Office Space (Blu-ray) – $5.88

Pariah (Blu-ray) – $6.49

Persepolis (Blu-ray) – $6.50

Public Enemies (Blu-ray) – $8.57

Pulp Fiction (Blu-ray) – $7.00

Reality Bites (Blu-ray) – $8.72

The Secret In Their Eyes (Blu-ray) – $6.60

Seven (Blu-ray) – $7.00

Seven Psychopaths (Blu-ray) – $7.99

Shutter Island (Blu-ray) – $6.88

A Single Man (Blu-ray) – $6.37

The Spectacular Now (Blu-ray) – $7.88

Spring Breakers (Blu-ray) – $9.94

Synecdoche, NY (Blu-ray) – $6.30

There Will Be Blood (Blu-ray) – $7.88

The Tree of Life (Blu-ray) – $6.99

The Truman Show (Blu-ray) – $7.99

True Grit (Blu-ray) – $7.99

This is the End (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Vanilla Sky (Blu-ray pre-order) – $8.30

We Own the Night (Blu-ray) – $6.94

Where the Wild Things Are (Blu-ray) – $6.94

Whiplash (Blu-ray) – $14.99

The Wrestler (Blu-ray) – $6.72

Zero Dark Thirty (Blu-ray) – $9.99

What are you picking up this week?

New to Streaming: ‘Kumiko,’ Wild Tales,’ ‘Manglehorn,’ ‘High Fidelity,’ and More

Written by TFS Staff, June 19, 2015 at 1:00 pm 

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With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit the interwebs. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

A Most Wanted Man (Anton Corbijn)

Anton Corbijn‘s The American is a restrained, absorbing and visually staggering story of an assassin on his final mission, but the marketing sold it as star-powered, edge-of-your-seat thriller. With his follow-up, an adaptation of the John le Carré novel A Most Wanted Man, those expecting the former might be disappointed, as it sways to the latter, resulting in an above-average thriller that could have used a more unconventional visual approach. – Jordan R. (full review)

Where to Stream: Netflix, Amazon Prime

Amour Fou (Jessica Hausner)

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What will likely be the highlight of the Cannes Film Festival: Jessica Hausner‘s Amour Fou. The Austrian director’s sixth film is ecstatically original: a work of film-history-philosophy with a digital-cinema palette of acutely crafted compositions. Amour Fou seamlessly blends together the paintings of Vermeer, the acting of Bresson, and the psychological undercurrents of a Dostoevsky novel. It is an intensely thrilling work that manages to combine a passionately dispassionate love story of the highest order with a larger socio-historical examination of a new era of freedom, and the tragedy beset by those trapped in its enclosed world. – Peter L. (full review)

Where to Stream: Amazon, iTunes, Google

Buzzard (Joel Potrykus)

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In an episode of my podcast, The Cinephiliacs, colleague Vadim Rizov noted a humorous but mostly essential statement when describing his disappointment with the movement of the Duplass Brothers into more mainstream territory: “Bros need independent movies, too.” Most depictions of “bro culture” have depended on some of the loudest names in Hollywood — Judd Apatow, Adam McKay, and Seth Rogen among others. The problem is that these bro movies often seem to focus on the pleasures and perils of being a bro — a subject only worthy of intermittent screen depiction — and few of them use that milieu to explore other factors. That’s what makes Buzzard, Joel Potrykus’s second feature, one of the most exciting pictures in contemporary American cinema. – Peter L. (full review)

Where to Stream: Amazon Prime

Danny Collins (Dan Fogelman)

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The directorial debut of Dan Fogelman (the writer behind Crazy, Stupid, Love. and Tangled), Danny Collins follows Al Pacino as an aging rocker who tries to lead a better life after receiving a lost letter that had been sent to him by his idol John Lennon more than 40 years ago. With a strong central performance from Pacino, it’s a surprisingly moving and well-told drama even if it’s a touch too on-the-nose at times. – Leonard P.

Where to Stream: Amazon, iTunes, Google

The Gunman (Pierre Morel)

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With Taken director Pierre Morel at the helm and an accomplished actor who is hoping for his action breakthrough (Sean Penn), one can’t fault The Gunman for selling itself as another iteration of the aforementioned Liam Neeson-led franchise in order to incur more ticket sales. And while it has the against-all-odds action sequences, the plight to return a kidnapped loved one to safety, haunted pasts, double crosses and a wealth of international locales, this actioner differs in an attempt to add a layer of real-life conflict. This grounded aspect — perhaps attributed to the humanitarian-minded Penn taking part in the writing and producing — often feels muddled alongside the cliched trappings of the action genre, but ultimately makes for a slightly better-than-average revenge thriller. – Jordan R. (full review)

Where to Stream: Amazon, iTunes, Google

High Fidelity (Stephen Frears)

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Stephen Frears and John Cusack have the balls to take the “John Cusack rom-com,” turn it upside down and shake it out, over and over again. This rock-accompanied meditation on relationships offers some of the best writing of the previous decade. Remember that scene when Jack Black‘s Barry belts “Let’s Get It On” with his band “Barry Jive and the Uptown Five?” Of course you do, it’s hilarious. – Dan M.

Where to Stream: Netflix

Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter (David Zellner)

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One of the better directed films I’ve seen in some time, David Zellner‘s Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter is a tightly controlled, beautifully-shot oddity of a drama. The Brothers Bloom and Pacific Rim star Rinko Kikuchi gives a deeply felt performance in this ultimately tragic story. Premiering at Sundance Film Festival well over a year ago, it’s now available to stream after a theatrical run this past spring. #TeamBunzo, indeed. – Jordan R.

Where to Stream: Amazon, iTunes, Google

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9 Films to Watch Before Seeing Pixar’s ‘Inside Out’

Written by Jordan Raup, June 17, 2015 at 2:00 pm 

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Pixar’s long-awaited return to form will arrive this Friday with Inside Out, an emotionally vigorous adventure through the mind of a young girl experiencing major changes in her life. As we said in our review, “It is a thoroughly funny, sad, and profound piece of work, with plenty of comforting things to say about growing up and feeling down. The Cannes crowd was rapturous. One can only imagine the effect it might have on a young child.”

On this occasion, we’re highlighting a collection of films that were either directly referenced in the making of Pete Docter’s animation or ones that deal with similar themes. While they’re worth brushing up on before heading to the theater, each selection would make for a valuable watch if you’re looking for similarly themed offerings. Ranging from iconic animated efforts to some of the best films of this century and beyond, continue below and, in the comments, let us know if you’d have any to add.

After Life (Hirokazu Koreeda)

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At first glance, a Japanese drama about death and what comes next might not seem like the ideal double feature with Pixar’s latest family-friendly animation, but there are palpable connections with Hirokazu Koreeda‘s masterful After Life. The film asks this question: “If you had to pick one memory to take into the afterlife, what would it be?” Its story specifically focuses on fewer than two-dozen recently departed characters who make such a decision, following them as their memories get recreated to be one last eternal viewing. As for how it relates to Docter’s film: there is nothing more precious in Inside Out than one’s “core” memories, treated as tangible objects that must be preserved at all costs. Despite taking place on distinct ends of life’s spectrum, both films show the fragility and intrinsic value of holding on to such impressions. In the years to come, hopefully Inside Out will burrow as deep into our minds as After Life will certainly do for any viewer.

Dreams (Akira Kurosawa)

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While we won’t go into detail about a certain aspect of Pixar’s latest feature, we’ll just say that one can’t enter the mind without diving into dreams. For one of his final films, Akira Kurosawa took this idea to its greatest extent by creating an episodic feature based entirely around solely his own, which he’d bring to life from his own illustrations. With financing help from George Lucas, Francis Ford Coppola, and Steven Spielberg (as well as a cameo from Martin Scorsese as Vincent van Gogh), it’s a boldly realized trip, and proof that Kurosawa would’ve been a fitting director of Inside Out‘s Dreamland Studios. It should also be noted that the mix for Inside Out took place in none other than “the Kurosawa.”

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and The Science of Sleep (Michel Gondry)

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It can be argued that no film has dealt with memories and their repercussions with greater affection than Michael Gondry‘s crowning achievement, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. Much like Inside Out, the drama takes place mostly in the mind of our protagonist (Jim Carrey) as we weave in and out of his memories of a relationship with an ex-girlfriend, Clementine (Kate Winslet). If Pixar’s latest is primarily about the formative experiences of one’s life, Eternal Sunshine makes for the perfect continuation. Gondry’s follow-up, The Science of Sleep, doesn’t bear the same emotional weight, but would also make for a fine viewing. Here, we witness real-life and the world of dreams intermingling for an inventive experience.

One From the Heart (Francis Ford Coppola)

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With many of their films, Pixar draw inspiration from the most unexpected of sources. For their latest, and to some surprise, they looked to Francis Ford Coppola‘s dream project and financial failure One From the Heart. “It’s not the greatest movie, but it’s a fascinating film,” Pixar’s Ralph Eggleston tells Birth Movies Death. “It’s very theatrical in terms of sets and lighting, and it’s sort of like a stage play on film. That’s one of the biggest influences on the lighting for this film.” Sadly, Inside Out fails to provide voiceover from Tom Waits.

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Recommended Discs & Deals of the Week: ‘Spirited Away,’ ‘Wild Tales,’ and More

Written by TFS Staff, June 16, 2015 at 10:17 am 

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Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

André Gregory & Wallace Shawn: 3 Films

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When André Gregory and Wallace Shawn—theater directors, writers, actors, and longtime friends—sat down for a stimulating meal in 1981’s My Dinner with André, they not only ended up with one of cinema’s unlikeliest iconic scenarios but launched a film collaboration that would continue to pay creative dividends for decades. The subsequent projects they made together for the screen—1994’s Vanya on 42nd Street, a passionate read-through of Anton Chekhov’s Uncle Vanya, and 2014’s striking Henrik Ibsen interpretation A Master Builder—are penetrating works that exist on the boundary between theater and film, and that both emerged out of many years of rehearsals with loyal troupes of actors. Gregory and Shawn’s unique contributions to the cinematic landscape are shape-shifting, challenging, and entertaining works about the process of creation. – Criterion.com

Spirited Away (Hayao Miyazaki)

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He may not be making another feature film, but what is perhaps Hayao Miyazaki’s crowning achievement finally arrives on Blu-ray today. The Oscar-winning Spirited Away (which would make a fine double feature with this week’s Inside Out) is a visually and narratively stunning adventure that marks one of this century’s finest animations. This release includes storyboards and art behind the film, a look at the production in a 42-minute special, and more. For another dose of Studio Ghibli, Hiroyuki Morita‘s The Cat Returns is also on Blu-ray this week. – Jordan R.

Wild Tales (Damián Szifron)

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Damián Szifron launches a satirical and visceral dissection of the social and political currents running underneath his native Argentina, but Wild Tales is the opposite of a stuffy, calculated screed. Playing with a touch of the pulp ghoulishness of Tales of the Crypt, Tales features plenty of darkly comic surrealism that’s been subtly grafted onto modern social anxieties. Whether it’s a plane full of strangers learning of the demented connection that bonds them, a waitress at a road-side diner forced to serve the author of her family’s misery, or a demolitionist waging a war against an impound lot, Wild Tales finds a deeply entertaining catharsis in isolated fragments that begin as revenge, only to crossover to examine ideas about justice and human morality. Taken as separate stories, these vignettes are entrancing, but, most impressive for an anthology, when assembled they create a fearsome portrait of Argentina itself, one unlikely to fade from memory. – Nathan B.

Also Arriving This Week

Chappie (review)
Run all Night (review)
Welcome to Me (review)

Recommended Deals of the Week

(Note: new additions are in red)

Adaptation (Blu-ray) – $7.99

Alfred Hitchcock: The Essentials Collection (Blu-ray) – $30.99

A Most Wanted Man (Blu-ray) – $9.96

A Most Violent Year (Blu-ray) – $12.99

The American (Blu-ray) – $8.47

Amelie (Blu-ray) – $6.66

Anna Karenina (Blu-ray) – $12.05

Beginners (Blu-ray) – $9.10

Birdman (Blu-ray) – $10.00

Black Swan (Blu-ray) – $6.74

The Brothers Bloom (Blu-ray) – $7.99

The Cabin in the Woods (Blu-ray) – $7.88

Casino (Blu-ray) – $8.88

Captain Phillips (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Children of Men (Blu-ray) – $7.88

Cloverfield (Blu-ray) – $7.88

Collateral (Blu-ray) – $7.88

The Descendants (Blu-ray) – $7.40

Do the Right Thing (Blu-ray) – $9.47

Drive (Blu-ray) – $7.99

The Fly (Blu-ray) – $6.99

Gangs of New York (Blu-ray) – $7.50

Godzilla (Blu-ray) – $10.00

Gone Girl (Blu-ray) – $12.99

Goodfellas (Blu-ray) – $8.35

Good Will Hunting (Blu-ray) – $7.50

The Graduate (Blu-ray) – $7.50

Gravity (Blu-ray) – $10.00

The Grey (Blu-ray) – $8.57

Haywire (Blu-ray) – $7.64

Hot Fuzz (Blu-ray) – $6.50

The Illusionist (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Inglorious Basterds (Blu-ray) – $8.00

Interstellar (Blu-ray) – $12.99

Jackie Brown (Blu-ray) – $5.00

Jane Eyre (Blu-ray) – $8.33

Jaws (Blu-ray) – $10.99

John Wick (Blu-ray) – $12.99

Killing Them Softly (Blu-ray) – $6.96

Kingsman: The Secret Service (Blu-ray) – $12.49

L.A. Confidential (Blu-ray) – $8.51

The Lady From Shanghai (Blu-ray) – $8.99

Looper (Blu-ray) – $9.96

Lost In Translation (Blu-ray) – $8.71

Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (Blu-ray) – $6.50

Margaret (Blu-ray) – $9.49

Martha Marcy May Marlene (Blu-ray) – $6.99

Michael Clayton (Blu-ray) – $8.63

Never Let Me Go (Blu-ray) – $6.20

No Country For Old Men (Blu-ray) – $7.50

Observe & Report (Blu-ray) – $7.49

Office Space (Blu-ray) – $6.96

Pariah (Blu-ray) – $6.49

Persepolis (Blu-ray) – $6.50

Public Enemies (Blu-ray) – $8.57

Pulp Fiction (Blu-ray) – $7.00

Reality Bites (Blu-ray) – $8.72

The Secret In Their Eyes (Blu-ray) – $6.72

Selma (Blu-ray) – $12.99

Seven (Blu-ray) – $7.00

Seven Psychopaths (Blu-ray) – $7.99

Shutter Island (Blu-ray) – $6.89

A Single Man (Blu-ray) – $6.49

Snowpiercer (Blu-ray) – $8.00

The Spectacular Now (Blu-ray) – $7.88

Spring Breakers (Blu-ray) – $9.96

Synecdoche, NY (Blu-ray) – $6.59

There Will Be Blood (Blu-ray) – $7.88

The Tree of Life (Blu-ray) – $6.99

The Truman Show (Blu-ray) – $7.99

True Grit (Blu-ray) – $7.99

This is the End (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Vanilla Sky (Blu-ray pre-order) – $8.31

We Own the Night (Blu-ray) – $8.95

Where the Wild Things Are (Blu-ray) – $6.94

Whiplash (Blu-ray) – $14.99

The Wrestler (Blu-ray) – $6.72

Zero Dark Thirty (Blu-ray) – $8.00

What are you picking up this week?

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